Self-study|IT|Int|Lesson 10: Robotics

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Match the abbreviations with the definitions


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Tick the points that you consider true about robots.


💡More and more people have interactions with robots, smart devices, and intelligent software. They are used in education, entertainment and health care as well as in our homes. But how much do we really know about robots and their abilities?

Today we’re going to study this matter in detail and fill the gaps in our knowledge!

Ready? Let’s get started!

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Complete the questions with the correct words


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Consider the questions above and answer them based on your knowledge and ideas.

Use the voice recorder.

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Read the text and match each heading to the corresponding paragraph. Then mark the sentences as True or False

Your guide to robotics


Complete the sentences with your ideas


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Match the types of robots with the pictures


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Look at the types of robots above.

What could they be used for? Provide reasons to support your answer.

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Click on the hotspot «+» and read about different types of robots


Click on each button to read about the latest advancements in robotics and do the task below. Record your answers

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Atlas from Boston Dynamics

The performance of the 1.5-metre tall, 75-kilogram humanoid robot Atlas continues to surprise us. It can leap over a log while jogging and jump over wooden boxes with no break in pace. It walks on challenging terrain, keeping its balance when disturbed. It stands up, lifts and manipulates objects and executes a gymnastic backflip. And it also does parkour! Atlas uses its vision system to align itself and to measure distances to the parkour obstacles. Company founder and chief executive Marc Raibert hopes recent demonstrations serve as an inspiration for what robots can do in the near future.

Think over these questions:

1. Have you heard of any of these robots before?
2. Which are the most fascinating robots? Why?
3. Which do you think are the most useful? Why?
4. How beneficial do you think robots are for the present and the future?

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Glossary

🔹a cannula — a thin tube inserted into a vein or body cavity to administer medication

🔹an incision — a surgical cut made in skin or flesh

The da Vinci single-port surgical system from Intuitive Surgical

Robotic surgery represents one of the most important medical innovations in recent years. More robotic platforms are emerging, although their availability and use will depend on various factors (e.g. their cost).

The California-based company Intuitive Surgical recently launched its da Vinci single-port system. Through a 2.5-centimetre cannula and small incision, the surgeon can control three fully articulated instruments combined with an endoscope, and treat deep-seated damaged or diseased tissues or organs.

Think over these questions:

1. Have you heard of any of these robots before?
2. Which are the most fascinating robots? Why?
3. Which do you think are the most useful? Why?
4. How beneficial do you think robots are for the present and the future?

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Glossary

🔹exoskeletons — wearable devices that work in tandem with the user

🔹endurance — the ability to keep doing something difficult, unpleasant, or painful for a long time

Soft exosuit, a wearable robot

When it comes to wearing an exoskeleton in everyday life, most people do not want to resemble the Marvel comic-book hero Iron Man. But a lightweight, stretchy exosuit offers new ways of integrating fabric design, sensor development, robotic control, and muscular aid to increase a wearer’s strength, balance, and endurance.

Potential applications include assisting the elderly in enhancing their muscular strength, supporting their mobility and independence, and rehabilitating children and adults who have movement disorders. The sophisticated application of robotics will also allow each individual wearer to have personalised control over their suit’s physical enhancements.

Think over these questions:

1. Have you heard of any of these robots before?
2. Which are the most fascinating robots? Why?
3. Which do you think are the most useful? Why?
4. How beneficial do you think robots are for the present and the future?

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Glossary

🔹ubiquitous — present, appearing, or found everywhere

🔹seamlessly — without any sudden changes, interruptions, or problems

e-Series cobots from Universal Robots

Robotic arms from the company called Universal Robots are becoming ubiquitous in a wide range of applications, from research laboratories to industrial assembly lines to surgical guidance. In 2018, the company based in Odense, Denmark, launched its e-series of collaborative robots, or «cobots». Cobots don’t require specialized programming and learn tasks by demonstration and mimicking the motions of users, augmented by touch-pad controls.

The industry expects to see the rapid deployment of more intelligent human-robot interactions in a diverse range of environments, in which the robots seamlessly learn and collaborate with human operators.

Think over these questions:

1. Have you heard of any of these robots before?
2. Which are the most fascinating robots? Why?
3. Which do you think are the most useful? Why?
4. How beneficial do you think robots are for the present and the future?

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Sony’s aibo

Sony’s toy dog aibo, introduced nearly 20 years ago, has made a welcome return. It has been given a new appearance, an enhanced voice understanding, and an improved ability to learn from its owners. The robot has also benefited from Sony’s increasing awareness of the role robots can play in childhood learning, or as a companion for the aged, particularly those with neurodegenerative diseases.

The ability to adapt to and understand an environment, recognize the needs and expectations of the people around the robot, and develop behaviors and personality traits accordingly (without being dependent on pre-scripted programs) are some of the most interesting topics in social robotics.

Think over these questions:

1. Have you heard of any of these robots before?
2. Which are the most fascinating robots? Why?
3. Which do you think are the most useful? Why?
4. How beneficial do you think robots are for the present and the future?


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Watch the video and choose the correct answers to the questions below

Before watching the video, study the following words and their definitions:

Glossary

🔹to freak out — to become so surprised, excited, or frightened that you cannot control yourself

🔹to have a (nice) ring (to it) — to sound attractive to the ear of the listener

🔹compassionate /kəmˈpæʃ(ə)nət/ — feeling sympathy for someone who is in a bad situation because you understand and care about them

🔹self-aware — understanding what your own true thoughts, feelings, and abilities are




Sophia’s joke

🔹Camembert /ˈkæməmˌbeə(r)/ — a type of soft round French cheese with a white rind.

«Come on, bear» sounds similar to «Camembert», which makes Sophia’s joke really smart.

You can find more jokes about cheese 🔗here and challenge yourself in answering them.

If you are interested to know more about Sophia and Hanson robots, watch the 🔗video and find the answers.

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Complete the questions with the given words. Then choose two questions to answer



Read the task and describe a prototype of your own robot. Use some of the words and phrases from the lists below

Imagine that you work for a robot design company. You and your team are responsible for designing the next generation of robots.

Think about the following questions and be ready to present your creation to the public.

  1. What name will you give to your robot?
  2. What would you like it to do?
  3. What sphere will it be used in (e.g. sport, medicine, transport, education, etc.)?
  4. What specific characteristics will it have?
  5. Will it look like a human?
  6. Will it be able to talk and react emotionally?
  7. What type of people will want to buy your robot?

Use the voice recorder.


Useful language

Verbs: to replace, to send commands, to run the world, to have a nice ring, to focus on, to make friends, to make jokes, to worry about

Nouns: a humanoid, AI, mental telepathy, safety, a glitch

Adjectives: splendid, efficient, genius, wise, self-aware

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Complete the summary of the article you read in the lesson with the appropriate words


Watch the video about the future of robotics and mark the sentences as True or False

Bob Ruairi

Bob: There is a kind of almost emotional response to a robot. You know, there is this kind of idea that a robot is a sort of an artificial human. But of course, all the other things that make architecture what it is are the things that come, you know, beyond the mechanical, beyond the … sort of … you know, automated. And what Gramazio & Kohler are doing in Zurich, that is really fascinating to us, is they’re breaking away from the idea that a robot is there to do menial, repetitive tasks, and they’re intervening in that world. They’ve been able to program what the robot does. In a way, they’re kind of using it as an extension of their own … their own bodies, their own tools, and changing what it does as it moves along. The robots have been around for the good part of 90 years. They really got going in the 1970s–1980s. And there are more sophisticated robots than this, but the fact that they’ve been brought into an environment where they’re being used as design tools is the exciting thing.
Ruairi: Now that the tools – both the hardware and the software – are becoming more affordable and easier to use, architects have actually been able to start to use the same kind of tools that had been out of reach for so long. So, yes, it’s only the beginning of things, but we really see some opportunities in design and fabrication. They won’t necessarily build whole buildings, but this country does have very old building stock; we literally need to retrofit thousands of buildings every day to meet up with demand. And so, it’s certainly worthwhile, considering how these kinds of technologies can work alongside traditionally skilled labor to actually be able to keep this country’s buildings up to the standard that they need to be.
Bob: What we’re looking at now with these technologies is we can bring them into the academic environment, and students and academics can, in effect, experiment with the idea of building, the idea of making. I think that opens up a very exciting new domain for universities. It might be that we are starting to be regarded potentially as a place to prototype things that might not be prototyped elsewhere. We can carry a certain level of risk that the commercial world can’t carry, in the sense that research that fails is very valuable, but in the commercial world, it’s a slightly – it’s obviously a very different scenario. So, I think this technology opens up not just something for architects, but for universities across the whole built environment sector, and allows us to do things that can’t be done elsewhere.


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Read about game programming and complete the gaps with the given words. It will help you get more ideas on the topic for the next lesson

The basics of game programming


Look at your roadmap and see your progress

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Урок Homework Курс
  • Decode the abbreviations
  • Robotics
  • The guide to robotics
  • The types of robots
  • Robots in detail
  • Sophia the Robot
  • Your own robot
  • Homework 1
  • Homework 2