Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures

Warm-up


pic1_Business|Adv|L10


Discuss the questions with your teacher


1. What factors are important when you want to successfully conduct a conversation in business?

2. What types of business communication do you know?

3. What are the challenges provided to businesses by international markets?

4. Can business networking be considered a marketing method? Why (not)?

Vocabulary revision


Mark the wrong word

pic2_Business|Adv|L10



Complete the conversation below with the words in the box

mouth / wall / picture / stick / grapevine / wavelength / bush / loop

International market


pic3_Business|Adv|L10


Match the words to make common word partnerships


Mark the odd verb or verb phrase out in each group

Vocabulary revision


Match the halves of the expressions

pic4_Business|Adv|L10



Complete the sentences

Check your Grammar


Put the words in the correct order to make sentences

pic5_Business|Adv|L10



Match the sentence halves

A new venture in China


Listen and answer the questions

pic6_Business|Adv|L10


Background Information

Drew Corporation, based in Dallas, USA, is an international group supplying food products to the retail trade. It is currently holding its annual planning conference in Mauritius. One of the discussion sessions, entitled «Succeeding in new markets», is attended by some of the company’s top executives. The leader of the session has asked participants to work in small groups and either talk about or provide notes on a recent overseas assignment, focusing on any cultural problems they encountered in their work. In one of the groups, Bob Hewitt talks about an assignment in China, Christina Novak provides notes about her work experience in India and Melissa Petrides writes about a business trip to Russia.



Bob | Melissa | Christina

Bob: I spent 18 months trying to set up a franchising network in China for our Munchem pizzas. I hired a local guy, David Li, to deal with the details of the business, like choosing sites, getting the necessary documents, checking agreements — that sort of thing. But I made it clear to him we had a successful business model for the pizza restaurants and we’d use it in China. We were doing really well in the other regional markets like South Korea, Japan and Malaysia, so we knew we had a winning concept.
Melissa: Bob, was there much competition in the Chinese pizza trade?
Bob: Yes, but we felt our tried-and-trusted marketing approach would work well there. And certainly we expected to get a foothold in the market pretty quickly. OK, we got on with it, and within six months, we’d opened 10 outlets in some of China’s biggest cities. My only problem was that David Li kept trying to give me advice about our business when I didn’t want it. He really got on my nerves. After a while, he seemed to become very demotivated and I felt he wasn’t giving me a 100 per cent effort. Our relationship got worse, and eventually I fired him.
Christina: I see. So … did you sell a lot of pizzas to the Chinese, Bob?
Bob: No, I’m afraid we didn’t. The whole project was an expensive failure.
Christina: Oh really? Too much competition, then?
Bob: Well, there were a lot of aggressive pizza businesses springing up, but that wasn’t the problem. We just didn’t get it right from the start. For one thing, the product wasn’t right. Our thick, 15-inch pizzas, which were so popular in the other markets, were much too big for Chinese tastes.
Another problem was, customers weren’t able to eat them out of boxes as they were walking along. And the Chinese like to do that. Also our toppings didn’t seem to appeal to them. The pizzas just didn’t taste and smell delicious to them. It surprised me, because people loved them in our other Asian markets.
Melissa: OK, so the product wasn’t right. What about pricing?
Bob: Well, we slipped up there, too. We went for the top end of the market because we thought our pizzas were better quality than the competition, but the Chinese didn’t see it that way. For them, our pizzas were too expensive and they weren’t value for money. They thought we were ripping them off!
Melissa: Mm. I suppose you had a home-delivery service, did you, as well as the takeout business?
Bob: Yes, we did; we thought it was one of our USPs. We guaranteed to deliver to any customer within 20 minutes. Unfortunately, we hadn’t reckoned with the traffic problems in the big cities. It was murder to get across the cities at peak times. Sometimes it was over an hour before customers got their pizzas. That really damaged our reputation. The word soon got around we weren’t reliable. But our biggest mistake, without a doubt, was to sell our pizzas through a takeout business. If the customers wanted to eat on our premises, there was only standing room. Now, Chinese people are very sociable. They like to take their friends and relatives to a restaurant and stay there for a long time. We should have offered them American-style restaurants with an attractive decor. They’d have enjoyed that.
Christina: So … are there still any Munchem restaurants in China?
Bob: Nah, my feeling was there was no way back. Our brand had no credibility after a while. I told Head Office we should sell off the restaurants and cut our losses.


1. Why didn’t Bob make more use of David Li’s business experience?

2. What does Bob mean when he says, «we expected to get a foothold in the market pretty quickly»?

3. What conclusion did Bob come to concerning the future of Munchem restaurants in China?

1. He didn’t agree with David’s suggestions and wanted to impose the company’s existing business model on the Chinese market.

2. He means they expected the pizza business to become successful quite quickly.

3. He decided that there was no point in continuing with them and advised the company to sell the restaurants.


Listen again and note down the mistakes Bob made because of his lack of knowledge of the Chinese market


Speaking


Rank the mistakes according to how important they were

pic7_Business|Adv|L10



Answer the questions


1. How would you prepare for a business trip to a country you have never visited before?

2. What would you do to avoid miscommunication and misunderstanding?

Melissa’s blog


pic8_Business|Adv|L10


Read and note down the cultural mistakes

My visit to Russia

Melissa Petrides

June 1 Met Georgy Volkov, President of Mika. Asked him for a five-year sales forecast for the products we’re supplying him. «Can’t do that,» he said. «We need to get permissions and certificates first from Ministry of Trade, tax authorities, local municipalities, customs, etc. It’ll take us a long while.»

June 7 Asked Georgy how it was going with the permissions and certificates. He didn’t seem pleased with my question. Wonder if I upset him. «You must understand, Melissa, it takes a long time to set up a joint venture in Russia.»

June 8-10 Great weekend at Georgy’s dacha in the countryside. Went fishing, then shared a sauna with him and his wife and had a wonderful meal (lots of caviar). Didn’t talk business at all.

June 11 Difficult meeting with G and colleagues. I talked about our fantastic range of organic food products. «We can’t sell them over here. No chance at all. They’ll be too expensive, customers won’t buy them,» he said. I was shocked.

June 15 Very tricky meeting. We needed to take legal advice about the joint venture. I suggested using Goodman and Parker, who have a branch in Moscow. We’ve worked with them in many countries and they’re very trustworthy. Georgy wasn’t interested. «I don’t know anyone there, plus they’ll charge us a lot and we’ll get nothing from them. Let us use my old schoolfriend Mikhail Popov. He works for a small law firm. They’ll give us good advice and they won’t charge very much.»

June 18 Time for me to fly back to Dallas. G had fixed up an appointment for us to see the Minister of Trade. Would have meant missing my flight, so asked our Moscow Branch Manager, Pat Sanderson, to accompany G to the meeting instead. G not at all pleased, but I wasn’t willing to cancel my flight at such short notice.

June 20 Pat Sanderson called Meeting not successful. He didn’t see the Minister of Trade, but only low-level officials in that department. G very unhappy. He told Pat, «I worked hard to set up the meeting with the Minister. My reputation will suffer because Melissa couldn’t attend the meeting. It’ll take me a long time to get back in favour with the Minister.»


Doing business in Russia


pic9_Business|Adv|L10


Listen and compare


Listen to the audio and do the exercise.

It’s not surprising that Georgy Volkov didn’t want to give Melissa a five-year sales forecast for the products they were supplying because there are so many permissions and certificates you need in Russia before you can set up a joint-venture deal. Also, Volkov probably didn’t want to give figures he might have to change at a later stage in their relationship. He didn’t want to be stuck with those figures. Melissa should have known that the joint-venture process was likely to take longer to set up in Russia than in some other countries.

Relaxing and socialising is important to Russians. So the trip to the dacha at the weekend was a good opportunity for both sides to develop their relationship.

Melissa shouldn’t have been upset about Volkov’s comments on the the organic products. He was trying to be helpful and friendly with his advice about the products. Russians tend to be direct when they speak English, just as they are in their own language, and foreigners shouldn’t be shocked if Russians appear rather abrupt at times.

For Russians, personal relations when doing business are important. That’s why Volkov wanted to settle the legal matters by using his schoolfriend — a person he knew well and trusted. He would feel more comfortable consulting a friend in a small legal firm than going to a large organisation where he knew nobody.

Finally, Melissa made a big mistake by not delaying her flight back to Dallas. The meeting with the Minister would have been an important step in setting up the joint venture. The Minister would have expected to meet someone of importance in the American company. When he learned that Volkov would be accompanied by the General Manager in Moscow, he probably thought that the lower-level officials in the ministry were more appropriate to attend the meeting. The right person to be there was either Melissa or her own boss.

Cultural awareness


Comment on these recommendations

GE_El|pic2


  1. When launching a new product in another country, it is important to take into consideration the tastes of the local people.
  2. The recommendation of local businessmen or business consultants will be of great use.
  3. It’s necessary to learn the body language signs typical for a local culture.
  4. You always have to be patient.
  5. It would be better if you studied the law procedures for doing business in a foreign country before you start.

pic10_Business|Adv|L10


Complete the sentences below with the words in the box

pic11_Business|Adv|L10


Match the main tips on successful business networking to their explanations

1. Be positive.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

2. Personal integrity.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

3. Follow up.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

4. Plans and aims.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

5. Relevant targeting.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

6. Help others.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

7. Be different.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

8. Elevator speech.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

9. Life balance.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect

10. Sustained focused effort.
Groups and contacts relevant to your aims and capabilities.

Unselect

Integrity, trust and reputation are vital for networking.

Unselect

Following up meetings and referrals makes things happen.

Unselect

Plan your networking — and know what you want.

Unselect

Help others and you will be helped.

Unselect

Be focused — and ever-ready.

Unselect

Differentiate yourself. Aim high. Be best at something.

Unselect

Being balanced and grounded builds assurance.

Unselect

Be a positive influence on everyone and everything.

Unselect

Describe yourself concisely and impressively.

Unselect


 

Listen to the text and mark the sentences True or False

pic12_Business|Adv|L10



Japan has slipped back into recession, leaving financial analysts to ponder over the implications for the global economy. Japan’s economy unexpectedly shrank for the second consecutive quarter. Two successive negative quarters officially puts a country in recession. The slide in the last quarter has taken economists by surprise. Figures indicated that Japan’s economy would grow by 2.1 per cent in the last quarter. Instead, gross domestic product (GDP) fell by 1.6 per cent between July and September. Many economists attribute the fall to April’s increase in sales tax from five to eight per cent. Many Japanese consumers have tightened their purse strings and are simply not spending.

World leaders are worried that Japan’s slide back into recession could be ominous for the global economy. British leader David Cameron said the world was on the brink of a second economic disaster. He told reporters he saw «red warning lights» for the global economy because of international «instability and uncertainty» and a slowing of growth in emerging markets, especially Brazil and China. Mr Cameron said the problems were «plain to see». He added, «The Eurozone is teetering on the brink of a possible third recession, with high unemployment, falling growth and the real risk of falling prices. Emerging markets, which were the driver of growth in the early stages of the recovery, are now slowing down.»



Listen again and match the phrases


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Vocabulary revision
  • International market
  • Vocabulary revision
  • Check your Grammar
  • A new venture in China
  • Speaking
  • Melissa’s blog
  • Doing business in Russia
  • Cultural awareness
  • Doing business international
  • Business networking principles
  • Japan recession

Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /var/www/u1033499/data/www/edu.skysmart.me/wp-content/themes/skyeng/functions.php on line 669