Adult|Welcome|Who wants to be a millionaire: Slang|Upper-Intermediate

pic1_Aloha|Millionaire Game|Upper-Int



Hiya! Today you are playing a cool game of «Who wants to be a millionaire?» The subject of this week quiz is «British slang». Do you know any slang words? Are you good to go?

Guess what the British slang word means

pic2_Aloha|Millionaire Game|Upper-Int

Question # 1

What does the slang word «knickers» mean?

Examples:

🔹a pair of black cotton knickers

🔹OMG!!! My knickers are still in my boyfriend’s car!!!



Choose a lifeline if you want. Remember, you can use each lifeline only once

Click on the link and read an article in Urban Dictionary

🔗Knickers

Phone your teacher and explain that you need their help on «Who wants to be a millionaire?». You have 30 seconds

You have scored ________ out of 100 points!


Origins of the word knickers:

From 1866, it was used in reference to loose-fitting pants for men worn buckled or buttoned at the waist and knees, shortening of knickerbockers

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By 1882, it was used as «short, loose-fitting undergarment for women»

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Question #2

What does the slang word «fit» mean?

Example:

Mate, that girl is fit!



Choose a lifeline if you want. Remember, you can use each lifeline only once

Click on the link and read an article in Urban Dictionary

🔗Fit

Phone your teacher and explain that you need their help on «Who wants to be a millionaire?». You have 30 seconds


You have scored _________ out of 200 points!


Origins of the word fit:

The word «fit» has been used within the sporting world to describe being in a healthy physical condition since at least the mid-19th Century according to the Oxford English Dictionary. But it was not long afterwards that it began to also denote a good-looking or desirable person. Only in 1884 in Henry Hawley Smart’s horseracing novel From Post to Finish, one of the characters says: «I want my girl to look as fit as any of them.»

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Guess what the British slang phrase means

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Question #3

What does the slang phrase «taking the mickey» mean?

Example:

Trudy Judy

T: I love your new trousers!

J: Are you taking the mickey?



Choose a lifeline if you want. Remember, you can use each lifeline only once

Click on the link and read an article in Urban Dictionary

🔗Taking the mickey

Phone your teacher and explain that you need their help on «Who wants to be a millionaire?». You have 30 seconds


You have scored _________ out of 300 points!


Origins of the phrase Taking the mickey:

This phrase is not new; the full phrase is «to take the Mickey (out of someone)».

Britons have been using this figure of speech for decades, if not centuries. A «Mickey», of course, is a «Mick»: a racist term for an Irishman (so nicknamed because so many Irish surnames begin with Mc- or Mac-). It is a common stereotype, in both the UK and the USA, that Irishmen have bad tempers, like to argue, and make good boxers. So, to «take the Mickey (out of someone)» means to take the fight, the vigor, the emotion, the self-importance out of them, by mocking them, usually in a very subtle way.

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Question #4

What does the slang word «legless» mean?

Example:

Downed 8 pints last night. I was totally legless.



Choose a lifeline if you want. Remember, you can use each lifeline only once

Click on the link and read an article in Urban Dictionary

🔗Legless

Phone your teacher and explain that you need their help on «Who wants to be a millionaire?». You have 30 seconds

 


You have scored _________ out of 400 points!


Origins of the word legless:

The adjective legless is used as a slang term to describe someone who is extremely drunk, particularly someone who can no longer stand or walk. The earliest example we can find of this usage is from a 1975 song by Andy Fairweather-Low, «Wide Eyed and Legless»:

But the rhythm of the glass

Is stronger than the rhythm of night

Wide-eyed and legless

I’ve gone and done it again

Guess what the British slang phrase means

pic9_Aloha|Millionaire Game|Upper-Int


Question #5

What does the slang phrase «bangers and mash» mean?

Example:

Bangers and mash is a traditional dish of the United Kingdom.



Choose a lifeline if you want. Remember, you can use each lifeline only once

Click on the link and read an article in Urban Dictionary

🔗Bangers and mash

Phone your teacher and explain that you need their help on «Who wants to be a millionaire?». You have 30 seconds


You have scored _________ out of 500 points!


Origins of the phrase bangers and mash:

The term «bangers» is attributed (in common usage in the UK) to the fact that sausages made during World War I, when there were meat shortages, were made with such a high water content that they were more liable to pop under high heat when cooked.

Origins of the phrase spot on:

The origin is military. It started being used in its slang sense after the World War II. It means right on the spot, originated from dead centre on a target.

Origins of the phrase screw up:

In World War II, the particle up used in combination with a verb made an impact on slang. Louse up, ball up, gum up, mess up, foul up were among the less offensive forms meaning «to botch, to make a mistake, to err repeatedly.» Screw up, in this sense, is first found in a December 1942 issue of Yank, and was further popularized in the 1951 «Catcher in the Rye», the famed novel by J. D. Salinger: «Boy, it really screws up my sex life something awful.» The verb is both transitive (screw up my sex life) and intransitive (I really screwed up).

Look at the tasks and decide if you want to complete them for the bonus points. You may choose not to do the tasks, do only one task, or do both tasks.

You have scored _______ out of 600 points!

You have scored _______ out of 1200 points!

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Choose the prize

Take £1000

money pounds prize

Go to a match with Beckham

Beckham David

Read the text and match the headings with the paragraphs

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Match the slang words with their meanings

Look at the picture and try to guess what the Cockney phrases mean

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Translate these sentences into Cockney

1. Think about it; use your head.

2. She has such long legs.

3. Give me your money!

4. I had a look at it through the window.

5. Don’t tell me lies!

6. I’m going to the gym.

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Now I

🔹know some slang words and can use them in different situations;
🔹can understand what David Beckham says;
🔹can use Urban Dictionary to translate unknown slang words;
🔹know how to win a prize in «Who wants to be a millionaire?»
🔹can understand and use Cockney slang.


Wordlist

Wordlist_Millionaire Game


Useful language

  • nil
  • legless

Complete the story with the correct slang words and phrases

Click on the correct word / phrase in bold

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Hiya! my name’s Mark and I wanna tell you how I met my gf Jessie.

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Watch the video. Write the correct answers below

Cockney slang is a rhyming dialect that was formulated in London in the early 19th century. But we thought we would test your players to see if they can think and speak like a true Londoner.

I’m so confused right now.

I’m terrible at rhyming.

Apples and pears—

Shares?

Stockholder shares?

Stairs.

So «apples and pears» means stairs? This is nuts!

Dog and bone?

Scone. Okay.

Tone.

Phone. Yeah!

Find me a phone? YES!!

Oh, phone? Okay, thank you! Okay, now I get it. Go ahead.

Pots and dishes? Uhm …

Missus?

Ach, pots and fishes, I don’t know!

Pots and dishes? Wishes? Yes!

Oh, pots and wishes! Dang it! All right.

Bread and honey? Running?

Bunny.

Money.

Yep! The guy said yeah.

I don’t really understand the game yet.

Tom Foolery. Uhm.

Uhm, jewelry!

Two in a row! I’m good luck, actually — It’s me…

Yeah, he actually just helped me — this is why we, you know, huddle together.

Go at them, Go at them, Go—

A pig’s ear? A pig’s ear. Pig’s ear.

Beer! HA-HA!

Beer. YEAH!

Beer? Most definitely!

I don’t know — Drinking a beer!


Read the task and instructions

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You are going to visit your friend in Britain soon. Write an email to your friend showing off your knowledge of slang. Use as many slang words as you can. You may use slang words that weren’t taken on the lesson. You can use the following ideas on what to write:

🔹Your life in your country (how you spent your weekend, how you went to an interesting event, etc.)

🔹Your feelings and expectations about your trip.

🔹Your plans for the trip.

🔹Your questions about prices in the UK.


Start your email with the phrase

Hiya Alex,

Finish your email with the phrase

See you soon, mate!


Wordlist

Wordlist_Millionaire Game


Useful language

  • nil
  • legless

Write an email to your British friend. Use the words and phrases from the list above

Instructions

1. Read the topic and the questions carefully.

2. Plan what you are going to write about.

3. Write the text according to your plan.

4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.

5. Learn the rules and see the sample 🔗here.

6. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Who wants to be a millionaire?
  • Question #1
  • Question #2
  • Question #3
  • Question #4
  • Question #5
  • Bonus tasks
  • It's time for the prize
  • What is Cockney?
  • More examples of Cockney
  • What I can do
  • Mark and Jessie's story
  • Guessing Cockney slang
  • An email to a British friend
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