Adult|Welcome|SpaceX rocket launch|Advanced

pic1_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int

🔹a major /ˈmeɪdʒə(r)/ — an officer of middle rank in the army or the US air force.

🔹ground control — the people, computers, and other machines on the ground that help to control a rocket or other spacecraft.

🔹to float — to be lighter than air, and to move slowly through it.

🔹peculiar /pɪˈkjuːliə(r)/ — strange.


Listen to the audio and answer the questions

This is Major Tom to Ground Control

I’m stepping through the door

And I’m floating in a most peculiar way

And the stars look very different today


1. What is this song about?

2. What other songs on this topic do you know?

Read the article and match the pictures with parts of the article

🚀a probe — a system or piece of equipment that is used for getting information.

🚀to launch /lɔːntʃ/ — to send a space vehicle, satellite, or other object into the air or into space.

🚀analog /ˈænəˌlɒɡ/ — using signals or information represented by continuously changing quantities of space, electrical current etc.

🚀a lunar scoop — a tool like a spoon with a deep round part, used for measuring or picking up various substances on the Moon.

🚀bulk /bʌlk/ — (uncountable) the fact of being large, e.g. He moved quickly in spite of his bulk.

🚀NASA — National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the branch of the US federal government responsible for the space program.

🚀to fling — to send something to a place, or to make it move quickly and with force.

🚀ashes — the substance that remains after a person’s body has been cremated (=burned after death).

🚀a stunt /stʌnt/ — something silly or unusual that is done to get public attention.

🚀taste buds — the areas of your tongue that recognize the flavours of food and drinks.


pic2_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int

A. Since 1977, when NASA probes Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space (where they still remain), any potential life forms with hearing abilities have had access to the sounds of earth. What are they? The sounds include music from different cultures and eras, as well as natural and man-made sounds (i.e., a kiss between a mother and child, the sounds of the wind, rain and surf), all on gold-plated copper discs. The contents, selected by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan, also include a message from President Jimmy Carter as well as 115 images encoded in analog form. NASA also kindly included a cartridge and a needle for ease of use.

B. Toward the end of his walk on the moon during the Apollo 14 mission, astronaut Alan Shepard informed NASA’s Mission Control that he «happened to have» a golf club, which he had attached to the handle of a lunar scoop. He also had some balls. After a few unsuccessful swings (because of the bulk of his suit, Shepard could only use one hand), he was able to drive one of the balls «for miles and miles and miles.» Upon his return to earth, Shepard donated the club to the U.S. Golf Association.

C. There have actually been a lot of human remains sent into space — in fact, there are companies dedicated to the service. But by far the farthest flung remains belong to the astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, who discovered Pluto and the other outer solar system in 1930. Before he died in 1997, he asked that his remains get sent to space. NASA later honored his request, including a small capsule of his ashes in the New Horizons probe that reached Pluto in 2015.

D. In 2011, when NASA launched its Juno spacecraft on a mission to learn about the planet Jupiter, they included three Lego figures on board! They hoped getting the toy involved would inspire more children to be interested in science and technology. But these aren’t the only toys to head into space — a Buzz Lightyear figure from the film Toy Story spent 450 days in space too!

E. The US restaurant chain Pizza Hut has announced that it has become the first company in the world to deliver a pizza to outer space. Yuri Usachov, one of the Russian cosmonauts living on the International Space Station (ISS) ate a pizza that the company had sent to him. Taking much longer than the usual 30 minutes, the pizza rode aboard a Russian rocket used to resupply the ISS.

The Pizza Hut chain said it paid the Russian space agency about $1m (£700,000) for the promotional stunt, including footage of Mr Usachov flashing a thumbs-up after eating the pizza, and for pasting the chain’s logo on a rocket. Spending a long time in space has the effect of deadening the taste buds, so extra salt and spices were added to his pizza.



Read the article and answer the questions

1. What sounds were included on the record sent into space?

2. How did Alan Shepard manage to take a golf club on board?

3. Why were Clyde Tombaugh’s ashes sent into space?

4. Why were toys taken on board the spacecraft?

5. How did a pizza get on board the International Space Station?

Match the words with their definitions

pic3_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int



Name the words illustrated by the pictures. Fill in the gaps using these words

stunned
stunned

 

to ignite
to ignite

 

a dummy
a dummy

 

a gamble
a gamble

 

an entepreneur
an entrepreneur

 

run out of something
run out of something

 

a cargo
a cargo

 

a dash
a dash

 

a lift-off
a lift-off

 


Watch the video and tick the things mentioned

🔹a launch pad — the surface from which a space vehicle is sent into the air or into space.

🔹SpaceX — a company which designs, manufactures and launches advanced rockets and spacecraft. It is owned by Elon Musk.

🔹Falcon Heavy — a rocket sent into space by SpaceX on 06.02.2018.

🔹a booster — an extra engine on a spacecraft that gives it enough power to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.

🔹Tesla — a company which designs electric cars, owned by Elon Musk.

🔹a core centre rocket — the central part of the rocket.

🔹a roadster — a type of car.

🔹a dummy dubbed Starman — a model of a person called Starman. «Starman» is also a famous song by David Bowie.

🔹a propellant — a substance used for making something move forwards, for example fuel for sending a rocket into space.

🔹to slam into — to crash into.

🔹a drone ship — a ship with a landing platform.

🔹Cape Canaveral — a cape in Florida, the USA, from which rockets are launched.


Anchor | DK | Voice over | Int | EM

Anchor: Good evening, and it’s great to have you with us here on a Tuesday night. And we begin with that stunning launch, a new American rocket built not by NASA, but by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk. And millions were watching today his 90-million-dollar gamble, launching his own rocket.
The SpaceX Falcon Heavy lifting off into a clear sky, some very unusual cargo inside: Elon Musk’s own Tesla sports car carried into space, where it is tonight — with a dummy there in the driver’s seat. That car is now speeding toward Mars — you can’t make this up — three rockets attached are supposed to come back down and stick to landing, but would they? Millions again watching that part, as well. All part of Elon Musk’s hope of carrying people back to the Moon and starting a colony on Mars.
ABC’s David Kerley leads us off from Cape Canaveral tonight.
DK: From the same launchpad America sent men to the Moon, Elon Musk’s SpaceX ignited the Falcon Heavy, the biggest rocket in the world. Actually, three rockets strapped together, the two boosters recycled. Cheers as they pull away from the 90-million-dollar vehicle.
Voice over: Successful separation!
DK: Those boosters slowing re-entry with another engine firing, and they nearly synchronized landing!
Voice over: And the Falcons have landed!
DK: And then, the big reveal of the cargo. Musk’s very own roadster from his other company, Tesla, which makes electric cars. In the driver’s seat — a dummy in a space suit, and a message on the dash — Don’t Panic! The playful test cargo accompanied by music from David Bowie. The plan is to send the Tesla toward Mars, but first, remarkable pictures of the dummy, dubbed Star Man, with a glorious background of Earth.
Int: What did you learn? What did Falcon Heavy teach you?
EM: Uh, I guess, it taught me, like, crazy things can come true. Because, I— it’s really— I didn’t really think this would work, uhm. When I see the rocket lift off, I see, like, a thousand things that could not work and it’s amazing when they do.
DK: The big rocket means much heavier cargo: satellites can be carried to space. And it gets Musk a bit closer to his dream of going to Mars, even possibly colonising the Red Planet. Musk, who said there was only a 50/50 chance of this working has a stunning success tonight.
Anchor: This was incredible to watch today. David Kerley, the best assignment of the day: watching it in person at Kennedy Space Center, where the spectacular mission took place. David, we saw those two boosters land back in Florida, so what are we learning about the third centre booster that was supposed to return back safely, and what about the car tonight, that David Bowie music playing there on the radio?
DK: I tell you what, first of all, David, it was an amazing launch. You could actually feel the thunder from the launch, as the rocket was up in the air. As far as that core center rocket, it actually ran out of propellant. It slammed into the ocean right next to the drone ship, damaged it, it was lost. A minor setback, actually, considering the spectacular day. And, of course, the pictures of the roadster from space — Elon Musk said today even he was stunned by those pictures. It was quite a scene, David.
Anchor: Million years, alright, David Kerley, none of us will be here to report on whether or not it survives that long. Thanks so much.



Watch the video again and answer the questions

Anchor | DK | Voice over | Int | EM

Anchor: Good evening, and it’s great to have you with us here on a Tuesday night. And we begin with that stunning launch, a new American rocket built not by NASA, but by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk. And millions were watching today his 90-million-dollar gamble, launching his own rocket.
The SpaceX Falcon Heavy lifting off into a clear sky, some very unusual cargo inside: Elon Musk’s own Tesla sports car carried into space, where it is tonight — with a dummy there in the driver’s seat. That car is now speeding toward Mars — you can’t make this up — three rockets attached are supposed to come back down and stick to landing, but would they? Millions again watching that part, as well. All part of Elon Musk’s hope of carrying people back to the Moon and starting a colony on Mars.
ABC’s David Kerley leads us off from Cape Canaveral tonight.
DK: From the same launchpad America sent men to the Moon, Elon Musk’s SpaceX ignited the Falcon Heavy, the biggest rocket in the world. Actually, three rockets strapped together, the two boosters recycled. Cheers as they pull away from the 90-million-dollar vehicle.
Voice over: Successful separation!
DK: Those boosters slowing re-entry with another engine firing, and they nearly synchronized landing!
Voice over: And the Falcons have landed!
DK: And then, the big reveal of the cargo. Musk’s very own roadster from his other company, Tesla, which makes electric cars. In the driver’s seat — a dummy in a space suit, and a message on the dash — Don’t Panic! The playful test cargo accompanied by music from David Bowie. The plan is to send the Tesla toward Mars, but first, remarkable pictures of the dummy, dubbed Star Man, with a glorious background of Earth.
Int: What did you learn? What did Falcon Heavy teach you?
EM: Uh, I guess, it taught me, like, crazy things can come true. Because, I— it’s really— I didn’t really think this would work, uhm. When I see the rocket lift off, I see, like, a thousand things that could not work and it’s amazing when they do.
DK: The big rocket means much heavier cargo: satellites can be carried to space. And it gets Musk a bit closer to his dream of going to Mars, even possibly colonising the Red Planet. Musk, who said there was only a 50/50 chance of this working has a stunning success tonight.
Anchor: This was incredible to watch today. David Kerley, the best assignment of the day: watching it in person at Kennedy Space Center, where the spectacular mission took place. David, we saw those two boosters land back in Florida, so what are we learning about the third centre booster that was supposed to return back safely, and what about the car tonight, that David Bowie music playing there on the radio?
DK: I tell you what, first of all, David, it was an amazing launch. You could actually feel the thunder from the launch, as the rocket was up in the air. As far as that core center rocket, it actually ran out of propellant. It slammed into the ocean right next to the drone ship, damaged it, it was lost. A minor setback, actually, considering the spectacular day. And, of course, the pictures of the roadster from space — Elon Musk said today even he was stunned by those pictures. It was quite a scene, David.
Anchor: Million years, alright, David Kerley, none of us will be here to report on whether or not it survives that long. Thanks so much.


1. How much does the rocket cost?

2. What is the test cargo of the rocket?

3. What happened to the boosters of the rocket?

4. What did Elon Musk think of the chances for the success of this launch?

5. What is Elon Musk’s dream?

6. What happened to core centre rocket?

Read the task and choose the thing you would send to space. Justify your opinion


Imagine that you are given an opportunity to send one of the following things in space. Which one would you choose? Say if you think that these options are good or bad. Justify your opinion using the phrases from Useful language.


Useful language

Phrases for agreeing and disagreeing with ideas

🔹I believe it’s a brilliant idea.
🔹This idea sounds reasonable.
🔹… sounds good enough to me.
🔹I find it kind of odd.
🔹To my mind, it’s a recipe for disaster.
🔹To be honest, I don’t see any point in this.
🔹If you want my honest opinion…

pic10_Eng_Murd|Aloha|Elementary


Now you can:

🔹understand news reports about space;
🔹understand articles about space;
🔹use phrases for agreeing and disagreeing to speak about space issues.


Wordlist_SpaceX


Useful language

🔹bulk
🔹ashes
🔹a lift off
🔹to slam into

Phrases for agreeing and disagreeing with ideas

🔹I believe it’s a brilliant idea.
🔹This idea sounds reasonable..
🔹… sounds good enough to me.
🔹I find it kind of odd.
🔹To my mind, it’s a recipe for disaster.
🔹To be honest, I don’t see any point in this.
🔹If you want my honest opinion…

pic4_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int

Match the sentence halves

pic5_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int


Complete the sentences with the words from the list

pic7_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int


Complete the sentences with the correct words

pic8_Aloha|SpaceX|Pre-Int


Complete the sentences with the correct words

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Unusual things in space
  • Vocabulary from the video
  • Falcon Heavy launch
  • What to send?
  • What I can do
  • Half and half
  • Missing pieces
  • Words, words
  • Relative clauses
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