Adults|Spoken|Intermediate|13. You’ve got mail!

What problem is presented in the picture? Do you have the same problem? Let’s check it and do the test.

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Tick the options that are true about you

How often do you use the Internet while …

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Read the article and decide if the statements are True (T) or False (F)

Internet addiction – a growing problem The New York Times has reported on a problem that many of us have but are not aware of – Internet addiction. According to reporter Tara Parker-Pope, millions of us are addicted to being online. She says this is a growing problem that is making us more forgetful and impatient. Ms Parker-Pope writes about various reports highlighting how technology is changing people. In one, she quotes cyber-psychologist Dr. Elias Aboujaode who says: «More and more, life is resembling the chat room.» He said we are living in «virtual lifestyles» which is negatively affecting our real-life relationships. Nicki Dowling, a clinical psychologist from Melbourne University in Australia, concluded in a recent study that ten per cent of young people had what she called «Internet dependence».
Tara Parker-Pope quizzed experts in this field on what the signs are of being overly absorbed in technology. She came up with seven indicators of «tech overload». The first is whether you check your e-mail before doing other things. Another telltale sign is if you always anticipate and look forward to your next online visit – a sure sign of dependence and addiction. The third point is if you say, «just a few more minutes» when someone wants you. Parker-Pope found your interaction with others also says a lot about how important the Internet is compared with family and friends; do you lie about how much time you spend online or choose to surf the Net instead of go out with others? Other giveaways include the «online lift» that stops you being unhappy, and when others complain about you always being online.

Internet addiction – a growing problem

The New York Times has reported on a problem that many of us have but are not aware of – Internet addiction. According to reporter Tara Parker-Pope, millions of us are addicted to being online. She says this is a growing problem that is making us more forgetful and impatient. Ms Parker-Pope writes about various reports highlighting how technology is changing people. In one, she quotes cyber-psychologist Dr. Elias Aboujaode who says: «More and more, life is resembling the chat room.» He said we are living in «virtual lifestyles» which is negatively affecting our real-life relationships. Nicki Dowling, a clinical psychologist from Melbourne University in Australia, concluded in a recent study that ten per cent of young people had what she called «Internet dependence».
Tara Parker-Pope quizzed experts in this field on what the signs are of being overly absorbed in technology. She came up with seven indicators of «tech overload». The first is whether you check your e-mail before doing other things. Another telltale sign is if you always anticipate and look forward to your next online visit – a sure sign of dependence and addiction. The third point is if you say, «just a few more minutes» when someone wants you. Parker-Pope found your interaction with others also says a lot about how important the Internet is compared with family and friends; do you lie about how much time you spend online or choose to surf the Net instead of go out with others? Other giveaways include the «online lift» that stops you being unhappy, and when others complain about you always being online.


Match the synonyms from the article

Internet addiction – a growing problem

The New York Times has reported on a problem that many of us have but are not aware of – Internet addiction. According to reporter Tara Parker-Pope, millions of us are addicted to being online. She says this is a growing problem that is making us more forgetful and impatient. Ms Parker-Pope writes about various reports highlighting how technology is changing people. In one, she quotes cyber-psychologist Dr. Elias Aboujaode who says: «More and more, life is resembling the chat room.» He said we are living in «virtual lifestyles» which is negatively affecting our real-life relationships. Nicki Dowling, a clinical psychologist from Melbourne University in Australia, concluded in a recent study that ten per cent of young people had what she called «Internet dependence».
Tara Parker-Pope quizzed experts in this field on what the signs are of being overly absorbed in technology. She came up with seven indicators of «tech overload». The first is whether you check your e-mail before doing other things. Another telltale sign is if you always anticipate and look forward to your next online visit – a sure sign of dependence and addiction. The third point is if you say, «just a few more minutes» when someone wants you. Parker-Pope found your interaction with others also says a lot about how important the Internet is compared with family and friends; do you lie about how much time you spend online or choose to surf the Net instead of go out with others? Other giveaways include the «online lift» that stops you being unhappy, and when others complain about you always being online.


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Match the parts to make sensible phrases from the article

💡Use 🔗Page Marker to complete the task

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Play the game «Tic-Tac-Toe»

Is Internet addiction such a bad thing?

What are some useful things a person can do instead of using the Internet?

Should children be taught lessons about Internet addiction in school?

Why are so many people addicted to the Internet?

Do you think the Internet affects your relationships with others?

If you had a chance to improve the Internet, what would you do?

How might our life resemble a chat room?

What would life be like without the Internet?

Do you think there should be a law to forbid the Internet? Why?

Listen to the text . What are the three reasons why emails are «dangerous»?

harassment — behaviour that annoys or upsets someone

dismissal — the situation in which an employer officially makes someone leave their job

invasion — an occasion when an army or country uses force to enter and take control of another country


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Big brother is reading your emails

Emails — so easy, but so dangerous. First of all, how do you write one? Short, like a note or a message? — but that can seem a bit familiar or, even impolite. Start ‘Dear X’ — like a letter? — but that seems a bit formal and long-winded. Because of their speed, emails seem to expect informality, brevity and wit.
But you must be careful. Emails are also a trap. They combine the informality of the spoken word with the legal force of the written word. And unlike real documents you can never really get rid of them. They are always there somewhere in the computer. Increasingly often, they are appearing in court. Cases of divorce, sexual harassment and unfair dismissal have all been decided recently on the evidence of emails that people had written, but not really thought about. One problem is that a joke doesn’t always work in an email. People don’t always get it. You can put one of these 🙂 to make sure that people realise something’s a joke. Or if it’s a rude joke put 😉 But, unless they know you very well, people are just as likely to find it offensive or stupid as they are to find it funny.
Many British companies now have a clear and open policy of monitoring emails. For them it is a direct way to try and avoid claims of sexism, racism and unfair dismissal. For the individual this may seem like an invasion of privacy — but don’t be too critical. Admittedly, the policy is there to keep the company out of court, but if it stops you making a fool of yourself as well, it can’t be too bad.


Big brother is reading your emails

Emails — so easy, but so dangerous. First of all, how do you write one? Short, like a note or a message? — but that can seem a bit familiar or, even impolite. Start ‘Dear X’ — like a letter? — but that seems a bit formal and long-winded. Because of their speed, emails seem to expect informality, brevity and wit.
But you must be careful. Emails are also a trap. They combine the informality of the spoken word with the legal force of the written word. And unlike real documents you can never really get rid of them. They are always there somewhere in the computer. Increasingly often, they are appearing in court. Cases of divorce, sexual harassment and unfair dismissal have all been decided recently on the evidence of emails that people had written, but not really thought about. One problem is that a joke doesn’t always work in an email. People don’t always get it. You can put one of these 🙂 to make sure that people realise something’s a joke. Or if it’s a rude joke put 😉 But, unless they know you very well, people are just as likely to find it offensive or stupid as they are to find it funny.
Many British companies now have a clear and open policy of monitoring emails. For them it is a direct way to try and avoid claims of sexism, racism and unfair dismissal. For the individual this may seem like an invasion of privacy — but don’t be too critical. Admittedly, the policy is there to keep the company out of court, but if it stops you making a fool of yourself as well, it can’t be too bad.


Discuss the questions

  1. What sort of writing style do you use when you write emails?
  2. Do you reply to emails immediately or do you wait a while and think about what you are going to say?
  3. Have you ever sent an email by mistake, that offended someone later on?
  4. Do you send jokes by email? What about pictures?
  5. Is it right for companies to monitor their staffs’ emails? Is that an invasion of privacy?

What problems can cause the things shown on the pictures? Have you ever used the Internet for those purposes? Let’s read the letters and discuss the situations.


Letter 1

Dear Anne

I’ve recently started going out with someone I met through an Internet dating site. We’re going to start meeting my friends and family soon. Should I tell them how we met? Or should I ask him to lie and say we met in a more conventional way? What do you think?

Amanda

  1. Do you have a friend who meets people through an Internet dating site? What kind of people use this method of meeting people?
  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of meeting people this way?
  3. What advice would you give to Amanda? Why?

Letter 2

Dear Anne

I’m in my final year at college. One of my friends has been copying lots of his final coursework from Internet sites. I think he’s going to get a really good grade even though he’s done none of the work himself. I’m angry about this and wonder if I should tell the college authorities. What do you think?

Mike

  1. Do you think there is a difference between using the Internet for research and copying large amounts of text from different websites?
  2. Do you know anyone who has stolen large amounts of text from the Internet to use in the college coursework? Is it a theft?
  3. What advice would you give to Mike?

Letter 3

Dear Anne

My teenage son spends lots of time in chatrooms on the Internet. I’m worried that I don’t know who he’s talking to or what he’s talking about. What can I do about this?

Tracy

  1. What kind of thing do you think Tracy is worried about?
  2. Do you think there are any benefits to her son spending so much time in chatrooms?
  3. What advice would you give to Tracy?

Look at the picture. What advice might the person need?

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Read the task and give advice to your teacher

The teacher is your friend who has turned to you for advice to overcome Internet addiction.

Give at least 3 tips and explain how they can be brought to life.

If I were you, I would set aside limited time for computer use. Some experts recommend no more than 2 hours per day. You can start with 4 hours a day and eventually limit it to 2 hours. But mind that you should strictly follow the restriction if you really want to give up the habit.

You can use these pieces of advice:

  • Set aside limited time
  • Take up a new activity
  • Find alternative ways to vent your emotions
  • Make friends in person
  • Stay close to a family
  • Seek professional help

Useful language

  • I think you should/must/need to …
  • My advice (to you) is to …
  • Why don’t you …
  • How about …
  • It’s a good idea to …
  • My recommendation would be …
  • You’d better …

Read the questions

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1. Can you imagine your life without using the world wide web?

2. What do you think about using the Internet for meeting people, doing hometask or working?

3. Do you think there have to be certain laws to control the using of the Internet?


Write an essay about the Internet. Use the questions as a plan

Instructions

  1. Read the topic and the questions attentively.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the text according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing before sending it for assessment.
  5. Learn the rules and see the sample 🔗here.
  6. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and grammar mistakes.

Some say that the Internet is making the world more convenient to live in. To what extent do to you agree that the Internet is making it easier for people to exist?


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • A new survey
  • The synonyms
  • The Internet discussion
  • Big Brother
  • Problem page
  • Useful tips
  • Essay

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