Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|42. Much/many/few/little

Grammar


Read the rules

We use much and little with uncountable nouns:

  • much time
  • much luck
  • little energy
  • little money

We use many and few with plural nouns:

  • many friends
  • many people
  • few cars
  • few countries

We use a lot of / lots of / plenty of with both uncountable and plural nouns:

  • a lot of luck
  • lots of time
  • plenty of money
  • a lot of friends
  • lots of people
  • plenty of ideas

Plenty = more than enough:

✔️ There’s no need to hurry. We’ve got plenty of time.

Read the rules

Much is unusual in positive sentences (especially in spoken English). Compare:

1. We didn’t spend much money.

but We spent a lot of money. (not We spent much money)

2. Do you see David much?

but I see David a lot. (not I see David much)


We use many and a lot of in all kinds of sentences:

1. Many people drive too fast. or A lot of people drive too fast.

2. Do you know many people? or Do you know a lot of people?

3. There aren’t many tourists here. or There aren’t a lot of tourists here.


Note that we say many years / many weeks / many days (not a lot of …):

  • We’ve lived here for many years. (not a lot of years)

Read the rules

Little and few (without a) are negative ideas (= not much / not many):

1. Gary is very busy with his job. He has little time for other things. (= not much time, less time than he would like)

2. Vicky doesn’t like living in London. She has few friends there. (= not many, not as many as she would like)


You can say very little and very few:

1. Gary has very little time for other things.

2. Vicky has very few friends in London.

Read the rules

A little and a few have a more positive meaning.

A little = some, a small amount:

1. Let’s go and have a coffee. We have a little time before the train leaves.

(a little time = some time, enough time to have a coffee)

2. «Do you speak English?» «A little.» (so we can talk a bit)


A few = some, a small number:

1. I enjoy my life here. I have a few friends and we meet quite often.

(a few friends = not many but enough to have a good time)

2. «When was the last time you saw Clare?» «A few days ago.» (= some days ago)


Compare:

1.

a) He spoke little English, so it was difficult to communicate with him.

b) He spoke a little English, so we were able to communicate with him.

2.

a) She’s lucky. She has few problems. (= not many problems)

b) Things are not going so well for her. She has a few problems. (= some problems)


You can say only a little and only a few:

1. Hurry! We only have a little time. (not only little time)

2. The village was very small. There were only a few houses. (not only few houses)

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Int|L42
All cars have wheels.

Read the rules

all, some, any, most, much/many, little/few, no

You can use the words in the box with a noun (some food / few books etc.):

1. All cars have wheels.

2. Some cars can go faster than others.

3. (on a notice) No cars. (= no cars allowed)

4. Many people drive too fast.

5. I don’t go out very often. I’m at home most days.


You cannot say «all of cars», «some of people» etc.

  • Some people learn languages more easily than others. (not Some of people)

Note that we say most (not the most):

  • Most tourists don’t visit this part of the town. (not The most tourists)

Read the rules

pic2_Adults|Grammar|Int|L42
Have you read any of these books?

all, some, any, most, much/many, little/few, half, none

You can use the words in the box with of (some of / most of etc.).

We use some of / most of / none of etc. + the/this/that/these/those/my … etc. So you can say «some of the people«, «some of those people» (but not «some of people»):

1. Some of the people I work with are not very friendly.

2. None of this money is mine.

3. Have you read any of these books?

4. I was sick yesterday. I spent most of the day in bed.


You don’t need of after all or half. So you can say:

1. All my friends live in Los Angeles. or All of my friends …

2. Half this money is mine. or Half of this money …


Compare:

1.

a) All flowers are beautiful. (= all flowers in general)

b) All (of) the flowers in this garden are beautiful. (= a specific group of flowers)

2.

a) Most problems have a solution. (= most problems in general)

b) We were able to solve most of the problems we had. (= a specific group of problems)

Read the rules

You can use all of / some of / none of etc. + it/us/you/them:

1. «How many of these people do you know?» «None of them. / A few of them

2. Do any of you want to come to a party tonight?

3. «Do you like this music?» «Some of it. Not all of it


We say: all of us / all of you / half of it / half of them etc. You cannot leave out of before it/us/you/them:

1. All of us were late. (not all us)

2. I haven’t finished the book yet. I’ve only read half of it. (not half it)


You can also use some/most etc. alone, without a noun:

1. Some cars have four doors and some have two.

2. A few of the shops were open, but most (of them) were closed.

3. Half this money is mine, and half (of it) is yours. (not the half)

pic2_Adults|Grammar|Int|L28


In some of these sentences much is incorrect or unnatural. Change much to many or a lot (of) where necessary deleting brackets ( ).

pic9_Spoken|Pre-Int|L10


Complete the sentences using plenty (of) + the following:

pic3_Spoken|Pre-Int|L4


Put in much/many/few/little

pic4_Spoken|Int|L7


Put in a where necessary

Put in little / a little / few / a few

pic1_Spoken|Pre-Int|L10


Put in of where necessary. Leave the space empty if the sentence is already complete.

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Int|L42
All cars have wheels.

Choose from the list and complete the sentences. Use of (some of / most of etc.) where necessary.

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Int|L25


Use your own ideas to complete these sentences

pic3_Adults|Grammar|Int|L42


Complete the sentences. Use: all of / some of / none of + it/them/us (all of it / some of them etc.).

If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.

Урок Homework Курс
  • The rules
  • Much
  • Negative ideas
  • A little and a few
  • Some food / few books etc.
  • Some of / most of etc.
  • All of / some of / none of
  • We didn't spend much money
  • Plenty (of)
  • Much / many / few / little
  • She has few problems
  • Little / a little / few / a few
  • None of this money is mine
  • All cars have wheels
  • All the windows were broken
  • These books are all Jane's
  • Homework
  1. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|1. I am doing and I do
  2. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|2. I am doing and I do
  3. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|3. I did
  4. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|4. I was doing
  5. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|5. I have done
  6. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|6. I have done 2
  7. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|7. I have been doing
  8. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|8. I've been doing / I've done
  9. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|9. How long have you (been)...?
  10. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|10. For/since; When/How long?
  11. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|11. I have done and I did
  12. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|12. I have done and I did 2
  13. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|13. I had done
  14. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|14. I had been doing
  15. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|15. The future: I am doing / I do
  16. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|16. I will and I'm going to
  17. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|17. Future: Continuous/Perfect
  18. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|18. Conditional I
  19. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|19. Can, could and (be) able to
  20. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|20. Have to and must
  21. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|21. If I do... and If I did...
  22. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|22. If I knew... I wish I knew...
  23. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|23. Conditional III
  24. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|24. Wish
  25. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|25. Is done / was done
  26. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|26. Be/been/being + done
  27. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|27. Passive 3
  28. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|28. Passive: He is said to...
  29. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|29. Have something done
  30. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|30. He said that...
  31. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|31. Say and Tell
  32. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|32. Do you know where..?
  33. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|33. Auxiliary verbs; so/neither
  34. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|34. Do you? Isn't it? etc.
  35. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|35. Gerund
  36. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|36. Verb + to Infinitive
  37. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|37. Verb + Object + to Infinitive
  38. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|38. -ing or to: change in meaning
  39. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|39. Try/Need/Help: -ing or to
  40. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|40. Like / Would like: -ing or to
  41. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|41. Some/any/no/none
  42. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|42. Much/many/few/little
  43. Adults|Grammar|Intermediate|43. Both/either/neither/all/every